Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/71881
Authors: 
Nagl, Stephan
Fürsch, Michaela
Paulus, Moritz
Richter, Jan
Trüby, Johannes
Lindenberger, Dietmar
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
EWI Working Paper 10/06
Abstract: 
In this article we demonstrate how challenging greenhouse gas reduction targets of up to 95% until 2050 can be achieved in the German electricity sector.1 In the analysis, we focus on the main requirements to reach such challenging targets. To account for interdependencies between the electricity market and the rest of the economy, different models were used to account for feedback loops with all other sectors. We include scenarios with different runtimes and retrofit costs for existing nuclear plants to determine the effects of a prolongation of nuclear power plants in Germany. Key findings for the electricity sector include the importance of a European-wide coordinated electricity grid extension and the exploitation of regional comparative cost effects for renewable sites. Due to political restrictions, nuclear energy will not be available in Germany in 2050. However, the nuclear life time extension has a positive impact on end consumer electricity prices as well as economic growth in the medium term, if retrofit costs do not exceed certain limits.
Subjects: 
Roadmap 2050
GHG reduction
renewable energies
carbon capture and storage
power plant fleet optimization
JEL: 
C61
Q40
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.