Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/71788
Authors: 
Levine, Sebastian
Roberts, Benjamin
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, International Policy Centre for Inclusive Growth 102
Abstract: 
The authors estimate changes in the distribution of household consumption expenditure in Namibia since Independence in 1990 and the effects on poverty. To produce comparability between two household surveys, they use survey matching techniques and apply the framework of stochastic dominance to test the robustness of the results. The results reveal a significant decrease in the poverty headcount over the period and small but insignificant decreases in the country's extremely high levels of inequality. Decomposition analysis shows that poverty reduction in Namibia is largely driven by growth in mean incomes rather than redistribution. Even so, there have been important changes in inequality, especially between different social groups, as educational attainment has replaced ethnicity as the main determinant of inequality between groups.
Subjects: 
Sub-Saharan Africa
Namibia
poverty
inequality
JEL: 
D31
I32
O55
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
529.08 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.