Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/71742
Authors: 
Moschion, Julie
Tabasso, Domenico
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Paper Series, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 7203
Abstract: 
This paper studies the respective influence of intergenerational transmission and the environment in shaping individual trust. Focusing on second generation immigrants in Australia and the United States, we exploit the variation in the home and in the host country to separate the effect of the cultural background from that of the social and economic conditions on individual trust. Our results indicate that trust in the home country contributes to the trust of second generation immigrants in both host countries, but particularly so in the United States. Social and economic conditions in the host country, such as crime rate, economic inequality, race inequality and segregation by country of origin, also affect trust. Evidence for first generation immigrants confirms that the transmission of trust across generations is primarily important in the United States, and, that differences in trust levels between the two host countries increase with acculturation.
Subjects: 
trust
migration
culture
JEL: 
J15
O15
Z10
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
370.01 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.