Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/71725
Authors: 
Lin, Carl
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Paper Series, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 7208
Abstract: 
Using 1990, 2000 censuses and a 2010 survey, I examine the economic performance of ethnically Chinese immigrants from mainland China, Hong Kong and Taiwan (CHT) in the U.S. labor market. Since 1990, relative wages of CHT migrants have been escalating in contrast to other immigrants. I show these widening gaps are largely explained by individual's endowments, mostly education. Rising U.S.-earned degrees by CHT migrants can account for this relatively successful economic assimilation. Cohort analysis shows that the economic performance of CHT migrants admitted to the U.S. has been improving, even allowing for the effect of aging.
Subjects: 
Chinese immigration
economic assimilation
Oaxaca decomposition
synthetic cohort analysis
JEL: 
J31
J61
J24
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
606.82 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.