Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/71697
Authors: 
Lehrer, Evelyn Lilian
Chen, Yu
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Paper Series, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 7254
Abstract: 
Using data from the 2006-2010 National Survey of Family Growth, conducted in the United States, we study the role of religious affiliation and participation in the labor supply behavior of non-Hispanic married women with young children. We estimate ordered probit models with a trichotomous dependent variable indicating full-time employment, part-time employment or non-employment. We find that the labor market decisions of Catholic women are not significantly different from those of their mainline Protestant counterparts, and that women affiliated with conservative Protestant denominations continue to stand out for their low levels of labor market attachment. With regard to religious participation, we find a non-linear association: the probability of non-employment is high both among women who have zero attendance at religious services and among those who attend more than once a week - the latter especially. Reasons for these non-linearities are explored. Our results suggest that future research on relationships between religious participation and various economic and demographic outcomes should be based on models that allow for non-linearities and also for differences in the effects of religious participation by religious affiliation.
Subjects: 
women's labor market behavior
female employment
religion
religious affiliation
religious participation
JEL: 
J22
J24
Z12
Z13
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
241.98 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.