Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/71639
Authors: 
Gazeley, Ian
Newell, Andrew
Bezabih, Mintewab
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Paper Series, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 7275
Abstract: 
We examine Trevon Logan's 2009 claim to have found low levels of nutrition among British worker's households in the late 19th century. Using the same data, we conclude that Logan's estimates are thirty percent too low. Logan buttressed his estimates by claiming that the income elasticity of calories demand was unusually high among these households, relative to other estimates, reflecting great hunger. We find that the elasticity is high, but not outside the range observed in other data sets. We also warn against the simple assertion that a high elasticity implies hunger.
Subjects: 
nutrition
living standards
worker's households
late 19th century
Britain
JEL: 
I15
I32
N33
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
584.91 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.