Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/71385
Authors: 
Fernihough, Alan
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper Series, UCD Centre for Economic Research 10/37
Abstract: 
Recent empirical research has questioned the validity of using Malthusian theory in pre-industrial England. Using real wage and vital rate data for the years 1650-1881, I provide empirical estimates for a different region - Northern Italy. The empirical methodology is theoretically underpinned by a simple Malthusian model, in which population, real wages and vital rates are determined endogenously. My findings strongly support the existence of a Malthusian economy where population growth depressed living standards, which in turn influenced vital rates. In addition, I find no evidence of Boserupian effects as increases in population failed to spur sustained technological growth.
Subjects: 
Economic history
Demographic economics
JEL: 
N33
J13
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.