Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/71310
Authors: 
Fairlie, Robert W.
Kapur, Kanika
Gates, Susan M.
Year of Publication: 
2009
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper Series, UCD Centre for Economic Research 09/03
Abstract: 
The focus on employer-provided health insurance in the United States may restrict business creation. We address the limited research on the topic of entrepreneurship lock by using recent panel data from matched Current Population Surveys. We use difference-indifference models to estimate the interaction between having a spouse with employer-based health insurance and potential demand for health care. We find evidence of a larger negative effect of health insurance demand on the entrepreneurship probability for those without spousal coverage than for those with spousal coverage. We also take a new approach in the literature to examine the question of whether employer-based health insurance discourages entrepreneurship by exploiting the discontinuity created at age 65 through the qualification for Medicare. Using a novel procedure of identifying age in months from matched monthly CPS data, we compare the probability of business ownership among male workers in the months just before turning age 65 and in the months just after turning age 65. We find that business ownership rates increase from just under age 65 to just over age 65, whereas we find no change in business ownership rates from just before to just after for other ages 55-75. Our estimates provide some evidence that entrepreneurship lock exists, which raises concerns that the bundling of health insurance and employment may create an inefficient allocation of which or when workers start businesses.
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
298.05 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.