Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/70606
Authors: 
Acosta, Pablo A.
Lartey, Emmanuel K. K.
Mandelman, Federico S.
Year of Publication: 
2009
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta 2007-8a
Abstract: 
Using data for El Salvador and Bayesian techniques, we develop and estimate a two-sector dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model to analyze the effects of remittances in emerging market economies. We find that, whether altruistically motivated or otherwise, an increase in remittance flows leads to a decline in labor supply and an increase in consumption demand that is biased toward nontradables. The higher nontradable prices serve as incentive for an expansion of that sector, culminating in reallocation of labor away from the tradable sector; a phenomenon known as the Dutch disease. Quantitative results also indicate that remittances improve households'welfare as they smooth income flows and increase consumption and leisure levels. A Bayesian vector autoregression analysis provides results that are consistent with the dynamics of the model.
Subjects: 
Dutch disease
real exchange rate
remittances
JEL: 
F40
F41
O10
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
629.23 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.