Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/70538
Authors: 
Alquist, Ron
Cha, Ben
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago 2012-17
Abstract: 
Late 19th century investors demanded compensation to invest in countries with poor institutional protection of property rights. Using the monthly stock returns of 1,808 firms located in 43 countries but traded in London between 1866 and 1907, we estimate the country-specific cost of capital. We find a negative relationship between institutions that protect property rights and capital costs. Firms located in countries with weak institutions were charged a premium compared to similarly risky firms located in countries with strong institutions, and this penalty appeared to be costly in terms of future growth. Countries that paid a premium for borrowing in London during this period grew more slowly after 1913 and are poorer today. We thus identify the capital market as a channel through which strong institutions promote growth.
Subjects: 
international financial integration
cost of capital
institutions
property rights
economic growth
financial development
JEL: 
F36
G15
O16
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
342.27 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.