Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/70147
Authors: 
Slavtchev, Viktor
Laspita, Stavroula
Patzelt, Holger
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
Jena Economic Research Papers 2012,025
Abstract: 
This study analyzes the impact of entrepreneurship education at universities on the intentions of students to become entrepreneurs or self-employed in the short-term (immediately after graduation) and in the long-term (five years after graduation). A difference-in-differences approach is applied that relates changes in entrepreneurial intentions to changes in the attendance of entrepreneurship classes in the same period. To account for a potential bias due to self-selection into entrepreneurship classes, only individuals having no prior entrepreneurial intentions are analyzed. Our results indicate a stimulating effect of entrepreneurship education on students' intentions to become entrepreneurs or self-employed in the long-term but a discouraging effect on their intentions in the short-term. These results support the conjecture that entrepreneurship education provides more realistic perspectives on what it takes to be an entrepreneur, resulting in sorting. Overall, the results indicate that entrepreneurship education may improve the quality of labor market matches, the allocation of resources and talent, and increase social welfare. Not distinguishing between short- and long-term intentions may lead to misleading conclusions regarding the economic and social impact of entrepreneurship education.
Subjects: 
entrepreneurship education
education
university
entrepreneurial intentions
academic entrepreneurship
difference-in-differences approach
JEL: 
A20
I20
J24
L26
M13
H43
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
820.52 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.