Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/69455
Authors: 
Siminski, Peter
Ville, Simon P.
Paull, Alexander
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Paper Series, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 7152
Abstract: 
Combat is the most intense form of military service, but several aspects of the training experience, which explicitly prepares people for violent warfare, are hypothesized to link service to violent crime. Using Australia's Vietnam-era conscription lotteries for identification and criminal court data from Australia's three largest states, we seek to estimate the effect of army training on violent crime. Using various specifications, we find no evidence that military training causes violent crime, and our point estimates are always negative. In our preferred specification (using only non-deployed cohorts), we rule out with 95% confidence any positive violent crime effects larger than 3.6% relative to the mean.
Subjects: 
violent crime
military service
natural experiment
Australia
JEL: 
H56
I12
J45
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
469.89 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.