Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/68839
Authors: 
Kleemann, Linda
Year of Publication: 
2013
Series/Report no.: 
Economics Discussion Papers 2013-10
Abstract: 
As consumers' demand for organic products grows, selling organic products potentially opens up profitable market participation options for farmers in developing countries. This paper studies two aspects of profitability for the producers. It uses hedonic demand theory and empirical analysis to examine the relation between conventional and organic markets using the strongly growing pineapple market as an example. This analysis confirms a nonlinear dependence of the organic market on the conventional one and a non-declining premium. The author concludes that there is a larger potential of the organic market and hence the number of farmers in developing countries who can potentially benefit from growing organic products.
Subjects: 
Price transmission
private voluntary standards
organic agriculture
organic markets
JEL: 
Q17
O13
L11
Q13
Creative Commons License: 
http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
513.42 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.