Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/68595
Authors: 
Anger, Silke
Kvasnicka, Michael
Year of Publication: 
2010
Citation: 
[Journal:] Applied Economics Letters [Volume:] 17 [Issue:] 6 [Pages:] 561-564
Abstract: 
Empirical studies on the earnings effects of tobacco use have found significant wage penalties attached to smoking. This article produces evidence that suggests that these estimates are significantly upward biased. The bias arises from a general failure in the literature to control for past smoking behaviour of individuals. Two-Stage Least Squares (2SLS) regressions show that the smoking wage penalty is reduced by as much as a third, if past smoking of individuals is controlled for.
Subjects: 
Smoking
Wages
Earnings
Regressions
JEL: 
J31
I19
C51
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Additional Information: 
This is an electronic version of an article published in Applied Economics Letters 17 (2010), 6, pp. 561-564, available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/13504850802260846
Document Type: 
Article

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.