Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/68055
Authors: 
Barrett, Alan
Duffy, David
Year of Publication: 
2007
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, The Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), Dublin 199
Abstract: 
Ireland has experienced a remarkable change in its migratory patterns in recent years and has moved from experiencing large-scale emigration to receiving significant inflows. In this paper, we use data from a nationally representative sample of immigrants and natives drawn in 2005 to assess the occupational attainment of immigrants in Ireland relative to natives. It is found that immigrants, on average, are less likely to be in high-level occupations controlling for factors such as age and education. When looked at by year of arrival, it appears as if immigrants who arrived more recently have lower occupational attainment relative to earlier arrivals, thereby suggesting a process of integration. However, a closer analysis shows that the observation of better occupational attainment for earlier arrivals can be explained by a change in the national origin mix of Ireland's immigrants, with immigrants from the New Member States of the European Union having the lowest occupational attainment. Within national groups there is generally no clear evidence of improved occupational attainment over time.
Subjects: 
Immigrants
labour market integration
Ireland
JEL: 
J61
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
474.25 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.