Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/68009
Authors: 
Smyth, Emer
Darmody, Merike
Year of Publication: 
2007
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, The Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), Dublin 198
Abstract: 
This article examines the processes influencing the choice of non-traditional subjects by girls in lower secondary education in the Republic of Ireland. In particular, we focus on the traditionally 'male' technological subjects, namely, Materials Technology (Wood), Metalwork and Technical Graphics. Analyses are based on detailed case-studies of twelve secondary schools, placing them in the context of national patterns of subject take-up. Strong gender differentiation persists in the take-up of these technological subjects. Commonalities are evident across schools in the way in which the subjects are constructed as 'male'. However, some students, both female and male, actively contest these labels, and school policy and practice regarding subject provision and choice can make a difference to take-up patterns. It is argued that the persistent gendering of subjects has implications for the skills acquired by students, their engagement in education, and the education, training and career opportunities open to them on leaving school.
Subjects: 
Gender
subject choice
stereotyping
lower secondary education
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
438.38 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.