Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/67785
Authors: 
Milne, Frank
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
Queen's Economics Department Working Paper 1296
Abstract: 
The Financial Crisis accelerated a latent Fiscal Crisis that had been brewing in many Western countries. The paper outlines the causes of the Financial Crisis, and how this increased expenditure and reduced revenues for many Western governments. But these additional fiscal stresses merely advanced the day of reckoning when fiscal problems had to be faced Demographics (the Baby Boom effect) dictated that reforms would be required in taxation, health care and pensions to smooth the transition. Many governments had not prepared adequately, so that the added burden of the Financial Crisis provided a double impost on budgets. The paper compares Canada and Australia in this framework, showing that there are similarities and differences that are instructive. Both countries avoided the initial Crisis, but they may not be so fortunate in the near future.
JEL: 
G01
G10
H30
H60
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
975.72 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.