Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/67226
Authors: 
Glitz, Albrecht
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Paper Series, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 6841
Abstract: 
This paper provides a comprehensive description of the nature and extent of ethnic segregation in Germany. Using matched employer-employee data for the universe of German workers over the period 1975 to 2008, I show that there is substantial ethnic segregation across both workplaces and residential locations and that the extent of segregation has been relatively stable over the last 30 years. Workplace segregation is particularly pronounced in agriculture and mining, construction, and the service sector, and among low-educated workers. Ethnic minority workers are segregated not only from native workers but also from workers of other ethnic groups, but less so if they share a common language. From a dynamic perspective, for given cohorts of workers, the results show a clear pattern of assimilation, reminiscent of typical earnings assimilation profiles, with immigrants being increasingly less likely to work in segregated workplaces with time spent in the host country.
Subjects: 
ethnic minorities
residential segregation
workplace segregation
JEL: 
J61
J63
J31
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
374.38 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.