Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/66218
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCawley, John H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGrabka, Markus M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLillard, Dean R.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-16T16:31:50Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-16T16:31:50Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citation|aSchmollers Jahrbuch |c0342-1783 |v125 |h1 |p119-129en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/66218-
dc.description.abstractThis paper investigates and compares the relationship between obesity and earnings in the U.S. and Germany. Using data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (U.S.) and the German Socio-Economic Panel, instrumental variables models are estimated that account for the endogeneity of body weight. We find that, in both countries, heavier women tend to earn less. For example, obesity is associated with almost 20 percent lower earnings for U.S. and German women. We test for causality using IV models; these models suggest that weight may lower labor earnings for U.S. women. However, our IV results yield no evidence of a causal impact of weight on earnings for women in Germany or for men in either country.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aDuncker&Humblot |cBerlin-
dc.subject.jelJ71en_US
dc.subject.jelJ31en_US
dc.subject.jelJ10en_US
dc.subject.jelI10en_US
dc.subject.ddc330-
dc.subject.keywordObesityen_US
dc.subject.keywordWeighten_US
dc.subject.keywordLabor Market Outcomesen_US
dc.subject.keywordIV estimationen_US
dc.subject.stwEinkommenen_US
dc.subject.stwGesundheiten_US
dc.subject.stwVergleichen_US
dc.subject.stwDeutschlanden_US
dc.subject.stwUSAen_US
dc.titleA Comparison of the Relationship between Obesity and Earnings in the U.S. and Germanyen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.ppn730080803-
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-
dc.identifier.repecRePEc:zbw:espost:66218-

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.