Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/64455
Authors: 
Berik, Günseli
Bilginsoy, Cihan
Williams, Larry S.
Year of Publication: 
2008
Series/Report no.: 
Working Paper, University of Utah, Department of Economics 2008-15
Abstract: 
This paper uses micro data from Oregon to measure the gender and minority training gaps in apprenticeship training. Its methodological innovation is the use of on-the-job training credit hours of exiting workers as the measure of the quantity of training. Apprentices who started training between 1991 and 2002 are followed through 2007. Controlling for individual and program attributes, women and racial/ethnic minorities on average receive less training than men and whites, respectively. Union programs deliver more training than nonunion programs, regardless of gender and race/ethnicity. Prior education level has a strong impact on training, especially for women and minorities. The evidence does not support the hypothesis that apprentices who quit are sufficiently qualified to be able to obtain high-skill jobs.
Subjects: 
Training
Gender
Race
Unions
JEL: 
J15
J24
J51
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
168.58 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.