Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/63553
Authors: 
White, Howard
Year of Publication: 
2007
Series/Report no.: 
Research Paper, UNU-WIDER, United Nations University (UNU) 2007/75
Abstract: 
The ultimate measure of aid effectiveness is how aid affects the lives of poor people in developing countries. The huge literature on aid’s macroeconomic impact has remarkably little to say on this topic, and less still in terms of practical advice to government officials and aid administrators on how to improve development effectiveness. But there is an expanding toolbox of approaches to impact evaluation at the field level which can answer both questions of whether aid works, and, properly applied, why it works (or not, as the case may be). This paper lays out these approaches, describing some of their uses by official development agencies. I advocate a theory-based approach to impact evaluation design, as this is most likely to yield policy insights. Academics need to engage in these real world issues and debates if their work is to help alleviate the plight of the world’s poor.
Subjects: 
aid effectiveness
impact evaluation
quasi-experimental design
results agenda
JEL: 
O1
O12
O2
O22
ISBN: 
978-92-9230-028-9
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
126.46 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.