Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/63496
Authors: 
Nyyssölä, Milla
Year of Publication: 
2007
Series/Report no.: 
Research Paper, UNU-WIDER, United Nations University (UNU) 2007/85
Abstract: 
This paper uses data from the Nepal Living Standards Survey 2 (2003/2004) to find evidence to whether children are less likely to work and more likely to attend school in a household where the mother has a say in the intra-family decision-making, than in one where the father holds all the power. This is done by using a bivariate probit model with two dependent variables: child labour and school attendance. The results support the hypothesis that in households where mothers have bargaining power, measured in particular with mother’s non-labour income (remittances), mother’s marriage age and her awareness of fertility controlling, children are less likely to be sent to work. They are also more likely to attend school.
Subjects: 
women’s status
gender
child labour
schooling
Nepal
Asia
JEL: 
J08
J21
I20
J16
ISBN: 
978-92-9230-038-8
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
256.54 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.