Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/63454
Authors: 
Berg, Servaas van der
Burger, Ronelle
Louw, Megan
Year of Publication: 
2007
Series/Report no.: 
Research Paper, UNU-WIDER, United Nations University (UNU) 2007/57
Abstract: 
South Africa’s transition to democracy in 1994 created new possibilities for economic policy. Economic liberalization brought sustained, if unspectacular, growth that reversed the long decline in per capita incomes, but left its scars in much job shedding associated with business becoming internationally competitive. This accords with international evidence that trade liberalization takes time to realize positive employment effects. Disappointing employment growth in the face of an expanding labourforce fed rising unemployment. However, using poverty estimates from a combination of sources, this study demonstrates that poverty nevertheless declined quite substantially after the turn of the century. Poverty dominance testing shows this conclusion to be insensitive to the selection of poverty line or measure. But empirical analysis does not allow strong conclusions to be drawn on causal relationships between globalization and poverty trends. – trade ; labour ; South Africa ; globalization
JEL: 
F14
F16
I32
ISBN: 
978-92-9230-004-3
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
204.01 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.