Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/60637
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBlack, Sandra E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLynch, Lisa M.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-17T14:26:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-17T14:26:54Z-
dc.date.issued2001en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/60637-
dc.description.abstractUsing a unique nationally representative sample of U.S. establishments surveyed in both 1993 and 1996, we examine the relationship between workplace innovations and establishment productivity and wages. Using both cross-sectional and longitudinal data, we find evidence that high-performance workplace practices are associated with both higher productivity and higher wages. Specifically, we find a positive and significant relationship between the proportion of non-managers using computers and the productivity of establishments. We find that firms re-engineer their workplaces and incorporate` more high-performance practices experience higher productivity. For example, profit sharing is associated with increased productivity, and employee voice has a large positive effect on productivity when it is implemented in the context of unionized establishments. These workplace practices appear to explain a large part of the movement in multifactor productivity over the 1993-96 period. When we examine the determinants of wages within these establishments, we find that re-engineering a workplace to incorporate more high-performance practices leads to higher wages. However, increasing the usage of profit sharing results in lower regular pay for workers, especially technical workers and clerical/sales workers. Finally, increasing the percentage of workers meeting regularly in groups has a larger positive effect on wages in unionized establishments.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aFederal Reserve Bank of New York |cNew York, NYen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aStaff Report, Federal Reserve Bank of New York |x118en_US
dc.subject.jelD24en_US
dc.subject.jelJ24en_US
dc.subject.jelJ31en_US
dc.subject.jelJ33en_US
dc.subject.jelJ51en_US
dc.subject.jelM12en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordWagesen_US
dc.subject.keywordLabor productivityen_US
dc.subject.keywordTechnologyen_US
dc.subject.keywordLabor unionsen_US
dc.subject.stwArbeitsgestaltungen_US
dc.subject.stwArbeitsorganisationen_US
dc.subject.stwProduktivitäten_US
dc.subject.stwLohnen_US
dc.subject.stwUSAen_US
dc.subject.stwNew Economyen_US
dc.titleWhat's driving the new economy: The benefits of workplace innovationen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn331485036en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US

Files in This Item:
File
Size
120.89 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.