Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/58766
Authors: 
Kazianga, Harounan
Levy, Dan
Linden, Leigh L.
Sloan, Matt
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Paper series, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 6574
Abstract: 
We evaluate the causal effects of a program that constructed high quality girl-friendly primary schools in Burkina Faso, using a regression discontinuity design 2.5 years after the program started. We find that the program increased enrollment of all children between the ages of 5 and 12 by 20 percentage points and increased their test scores by 0.45 standard deviations. The change in test scores for those children caused to attend school by the program is 2.2 standard deviations. We also find that the program was particularly effective for girls, increasing their enrollment rate by 5 percentage points more than boys', although this did not translate into a differential effect on test scores. Disentangling the effects of school access from the unique characteristics of the new schools, we find that the unique characteristics were responsible for a 13 percentage point increase in enrollment and 0.35 standard deviations in test scores, while simply providing a school increased enrollment by 26.5 percentage points and test scores by 0.323 standard deviations. The unique characteristics of the school account for the entire difference in the treatment effect by gender.
Subjects: 
Africa
education
gender inequality
enrollment
JEL: 
I24
I25
I28
O15
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
417.71 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.