Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/58692
Authors: 
Grignon, Michel
Owusu, Yaw
Sweetman, Arthur
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Paper series, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 6517
Abstract: 
Health workforce shortages in developed countries are perceived to be central drivers of health professionals' international migration, one ramification being negative impacts on developing nations' healthcare delivery. After a descriptive international overview, selected economic issues are discussed for developed and developing countries. Health labour markets' unique characteristics imply great complexity in developed economies involving government intervention, licensure, regulation, and (quasi-)union activity. These features affect migrants' decisions, economic integration, and impacts on the receiving nations' health workforce and society. Developing countries sometimes educate citizens in expectation of emigration, while others pursue international treaties in attempts to manage migrant flows.
Subjects: 
migration
health professionals
international medical graduates
JEL: 
J61
I15
I18
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
512.73 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.