Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/58507
Authors: 
Beckhusen, Julia
Florax, Raymond J. G. M.
de Graaff, Thomas
Poot, Jacques
Waldorf, Brigitte
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion Paper series, Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 6363
Abstract: 
Learning English is a potentially profitable investment for immigrants in the U.S.: while there are initial costs, the subsequent benefits include the ability to communicate with the majority of the population, potentially leading to better paying jobs and economic success in the new country. These payoffs are lessened if immigrants choose to live and work in ethnic enclaves where the necessity to communicate in English is weak. Ethnic enclaves are widespread and persistent in the U.S. This study uses data from the 2010 American Community Survey to examine the impact of residential and occupational segregation on immigrants' ability to speak English. We allow for heterogeneity in the relationship between segregation and English language proficiency across ethnic groups and focus specifically on Mexican and Chinese immigrants. Our results show that immigrants in the U.S. who live and work among high concentrations of their countrymen are less likely to be proficient in English than those who are less residentially and occupationally segregated. The magnitude of the effect of segregation on language proficiency varies across immigrants' birthplaces and other salient characteristics defining the immigration context.
Subjects: 
U.S. immigration
language acquisition
ethnic enclaves
residential segregation
occupational segregation
JEL: 
F22
J15
J24
R23
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
866.32 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.