Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDe Juan, Alexanderen_US
dc.description.abstractInstitutions can contribute to regulating interethnic conflict; however, in many cases they fail to bring about lasting peace. The paper argues that their negligence of intraethnic factors accounts for some of this failure. Ethnic groups are often treated as unitary actors even though most consist of various linguistic, tribal or religious subgroups. This internal heterogeneity is often obscured by overarching collective ethnic identities that are fostered by interethnic conflict. However, when such interethnic conflict is settled, these subgroup differences may come back to the fore. This resurgence can lead to subgroup conflict about the political and economic resources provided through intergroup institutional settlements. Such conflict can in turn undermine the peace-making effect of intergroup arrangements. Different subgroup identity constellations make such destructive effects more or less likely. The paper focuses on self-government provisions in the aftermath of violent interethnic conflict and argues that lasting intergroup arrangements are especially challenging when they involve contested ethnic groups.en_US
dc.publisher|aGerman Institute of Global and Area Studies (GIGA) |cHamburgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aGIGA working papers |x195en_US
dc.subject.keywordethnic conflicten_US
dc.subject.keywordinstitutions, self-governmenten_US
dc.subject.stwEthnische Diskriminierungen_US
dc.subject.stwSozialer Konflikten_US
dc.subject.stwInstitutionelle Infrastrukturen_US
dc.titleInstitutional conflict settlement in divided societies: The role of subgroup identities in self-government arrangementsen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US

Files in This Item:
575.56 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.