Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/56157
Authors: 
Goldfarb, Brent
Henrekson, Magnus
Year of Publication: 
2001
Series/Report no.: 
SSE/EFI Working Paper Series in Economics and Finance 463
Abstract: 
What national policies are most efficient in promoting the commercialization of university-generated knowledge? We address this question by characterizing and evaluating the policy pursued in Sweden and the US, two countries that put a great deal of resources into university R&D, but follow very different models for commercialization. Despite a leading academic record, there is an impression of laggard rates of commercialization of academic research results in Sweden. Although there exist no micro data to evaluate this impression, we argue that it is likely to be true in part due to the top-down nature of Swedish policies aimed at commercializing these innovations as well as an academic environment that discourages academics from actively participating in the commercialization of their ideas. This sits in stark contrast to a US institutional setting characterized by competition between universities for research funds and research personnel, which in turn has led to significant academic freedoms to interact with industry, including significant involvement in new firms.
Subjects: 
Academic entrepreneurship
Innovation
Intellectual property
R&D
Spin-off firms
Technology transfer
University-industry relations
Universities and business formation
JEL: 
J24
O31
O32
O57
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
213.88 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.