Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/56052
Authors: 
Geys, Benny
Year of Publication: 
2012
Series/Report no.: 
WZB Discussion Paper SP II 2012-102
Abstract: 
Political parties are often argued to compete for voters by stressing issues they feel they own - a strategy known as 'selective emphasis'. While usually seen as an electorally rewarding strategy, this article argues that cultivating your themes in the public debate is not guaranteed to be electorally beneficial and may even become counter-productive. It describes the conditions under which 'selective emphasis' becomes counter-productive, and applies the argument to recent discussions regarding the strategies of mainstream parties confronting the extreme right.
Subjects: 
issue salience
issue ownership
party competition
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
147.52 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.