Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/54669
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorUppenberg, Kristianen_US
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-12T11:00:49Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-12T11:00:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citation|aEIB Papers |c0257-7755 |v16 |y2011 |h1 |p18-51en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/54669-
dc.description.abstractDrawing on the OECD's structural analysis (STAN) database, this paper contributes to the understanding of European economic growth through a decomposition into employment and productivity, across sectors, and across different time periods and countries. The US productivity surge from the mid-1990s continued for years after the bursting of the dot-com bubble. In the meantime, the EU-15's relative productivity stagnation continued. The sectoral perspective helps us better understand this divergence. While manufacturing remains disproportionally important for aggregate productivity growth, the market services sector, given its size, accounts for the bulk of differences across countries, also within the EU. Market services differ from manufacturing in terms of the nature of innovation and other drivers of growth. This calls for sector-specific analysis when designing growth policy in Europe.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aEuropean Investment Bank (EIB) |cLuxembourgen_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.stwWirtschaftswachstumen_US
dc.subject.stwVergleichen_US
dc.subject.stwBeschäftigungen_US
dc.subject.stwProduktivitäten_US
dc.subject.stwIndustriestrukturen_US
dc.subject.stwEU-Staatenen_US
dc.subject.stwUSAen_US
dc.titleEconomic growth in the US and the EU: A sectoral decompositionen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.ppn680132341en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.