Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKregel, Janen_US
dc.description.abstractThe term BRIC was first coined by Goldman Sachs and refers to the fast-growing developing economies of Brazil, Russia, India, and China - a class of middle-income emerging market economies of relatively large size that are capable of self-sustained expansion. Their combined economies could exceed the combined economies of today's richest countries by 2050. However, there are concerns about how the current financial crisis will affect the BRICs, and Goldman has questioned whether Brazil should remain within this group. Senior Scholar Jan Kregel reviews the implications of the global crisis for developing countries, based on the factors driving global trade. He concludes that there is unlikely to be a return to the extremely positive conditions underlying the recent sharp increase in growth and external accounts. The key for developing countries is to transform from export-led to domestic demand-led growth, says Kregel. From this viewpoint, Brazil seems much better placed than the other BRIC countries.en_US
dc.publisher|aLevy Economics Institute of Bard College |cAnnandale-on-Hudson, NYen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aPublic policy brief // Jerome Levy Economics Institute of Bard College |x102en_US
dc.subject.stwExportinduziertes Wachstumen_US
dc.titleThe global crisis and the implications for developing countries and the BRICs: Is the B really justified?en_US
dc.typeResearch Reporten_US

Files in This Item:

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.