Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKregel, Janen_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of the 1933 Banking Act-aka Glass-Steagall-was to prevent the exposure of commercial banks to the risks of investment banking and to ensure stability of the financial system. A proposed solution to the current financial crisis is to return to the basic tenets of this New Deal legislation. Senior Scholar Jan Kregel provides an in-depth account of the Act, including the premises leading up to its adoption, its influence on the design of the financial system, and the subsequent collapse of the Act's restrictions on securities trading (deregulation). He concludes that a return to the Act's simple structure and strict segregation between (regulated) commercial and (unregulated) investment banking is unwarranted in light of ongoing questions about the commercial banks' ability to compete with other financial institutions. Moreover, fundamental reform - the conflicting relationship between state and national charters and regulation - was bypassed by the Act.en_US
dc.publisher|aLevy Economics Institute of Bard College |cAnnandale-on-Hudson, NYen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aPublic policy brief // Jerome Levy Economics Institute of Bard College |x107en_US
dc.titleNo going back: Why we cannot restore Glass-Steagall's segregation of banking and financeen_US
dc.typeResearch Reporten_US

Files in This Item:
215.03 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.