Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Dearden, Lorraine
Micklewright, John
Vignoles, Anna
Year of Publication: 
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion paper series // Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 5839
League table information on school effectiveness in England generally relies on either a comparison of the average outcomes of pupils by school, e.g. mean exam scores, or on estimates of the average value added by each school. These approaches assume that the information parents and policy-makers need most to judge school effectiveness is the average achievement level or gain in a particular school. Yet schools can be differentially effective for children with differing levels of prior attainment. We present evidence on the extent of differential effectiveness in English secondary schools, and find that even the most conservative estimate suggests that around one quarter of schools in England are differentially effective for students of differing prior ability levels. This affects an even larger proportion of children as larger schools are more likely to be differentially effect.
school effectiveness
school choice
value added
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
218.18 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.