Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/51767
Authors: 
Cho, Yoonyoung
Newhouse, David
Year of Publication: 
2011
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion paper series // Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 5681
Abstract: 
This paper examines how different types of workers in 17 middle-income countries were affected by labor market retrenchment during the great recession. Impacts on different types of workers varied by country and were only weakly related to the severity of the shock. Among active workers, youth experienced by far the largest adverse impacts on employment, unemployment, and wage employment, particularly relative to older adults. The percentage employment reductions, for example, were greatest for youth in each sector of the economy, as firms reacted to the shock by substituting away from inexperienced workers. Employment rates, as a share of the population, also plummeted for men. Larger drops in male employment were primarily attributable to men's higher initial rate of employment, although men's concentration in the hard-hit industrial sector also played an important role. Within each sector, percentage employment declines were similar for men and women. Added worker effects among women were mild, even among less-educated workers. Differences in labor market outcomes across education groups and urban or rural residence tended to be smaller. These findings bolster the case for targeted support to displaced youth and wage employees. Programs targeted to female and unskilled workers should be undertaken with appropriate caution or empirical support from timely data, as they may not benefit the majority of affected workers.
Subjects: 
labor markets
emerging economies
economic shocks
JEL: 
E24
E32
J21
O15
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
993.82 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.