Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/51614
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBurks, Stephen V.en_US
dc.contributor.authorCarpenter, Jeffrey P.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGoette, Lorenzen_US
dc.contributor.authorRustichini, Aldoen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-10en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-23T11:31:17Z-
dc.date.available2011-11-23T11:31:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.piurn:nbn:de:101:1-20110629976en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/51614-
dc.description.abstractEconomists and psychologists have devised numerous instruments to measure time preferences and have generated a rich literature examining the extent to which time preferences predict important outcomes; however, we still do not know which measures work best. With the help of a large sample of non-student participants (truck driver trainees) and administrative data on outcomes, we gather four different time preference measures and test the extent to which they predict both on their own and when they are all forced to compete head-to-head. Our results suggest that the now familiar (β, δ) formulation of present bias and exponential discounting predicts best, especially when both parameters are used.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aInstitute for the Study of Labor (IZA) |cBonnen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aDiscussion paper series // Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit |x5808en_US
dc.subject.jelC93en_US
dc.subject.jelD90en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordtime preferenceen_US
dc.subject.keywordimpatienceen_US
dc.subject.keyworddiscountingen_US
dc.subject.keywordpresent biasen_US
dc.subject.keywordfield experimenten_US
dc.subject.keywordtruckeren_US
dc.titleWhich measures of time preference best predict outcomes? Evidence from a large-scale field experimenten_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn66955085Xen_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US

Files in This Item:
File
Size
227.39 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.