Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/50628
Authors: 
Walker, Ian
Zhu, Yu
Year of Publication: 
2008
Series/Report no.: 
School of Economics discussion papers 08,11
Abstract: 
There is some evidence to support the view that Child Support (CS), despite low compliance rates and a strong interaction with the welfare system, has played a positive role in reducing child poverty among non-intact families. However, relatively little research has addressed the role of CS on outcomes for the children concerned. There are good reasons for thinking that CS could leverage better outcomes than other forms of income support and, using a sample of dependent children in non-intact families from the British Household Panel Survey (BHPS), we find that CS received has an effect which is at least 10 times as large as that associated with variations in other sources of total household net income for two key educational outcomes: namely school leaving at the age of 16, and attaining 5 or more good GCSEs. We show that this remarkable and strong result is robust and, in particular, can be given a causal interpretation.
Subjects: 
parental separation
parental incomes
child support
educational outcomes
JEL: 
D13
D31
J12
J13
J22
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
212.22 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.