Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/50135
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorVan de Vliert, Everten_US
dc.contributor.authorTol, Richard S. J.en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-03-23en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-30T10:00:53Z-
dc.date.available2011-09-30T10:00:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/50135-
dc.description.abstractIn a 104-nation study we first demonstrate that cultural self-expression, individualism and democracy languish in poor countries with colder-than-temperate winters, but flourish in rich countries with such winters. Mild summers are kind to this syndrome of culturally embedded democracy in rich countries only. Using these climato-economic niches of culture, we then estimate how unarrested global warming in conjunction with unaltered economic growth would affect democratic culture in 138 countries and regions. Local warming in concert with local economic trends would weaken democratic culture, especially the strongly democratic cultures of Australia, New Zealand, Northern Europe, and North America, but would strengthen democratic culture in China and Russia.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aESRI |cDublinen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aESRI working paper |x378en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.titleLocal warming, local economic growth, and local change in democratic cultureen_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn654683697en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US

Files in This Item:
File
Size
315.36 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.