Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAker, Jenny C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorClemens, Michael A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKsoll, Christopheren_US
dc.description.abstractLabor markets in developing countries are subject to a high degree of frictions. We report the results from a randomized evaluation of an adult education program (Project ABC) in Niger, in which students learned how to use simple mobile phones as part of a literacy and numeracy class. Overall, our preliminary results suggest that access to this technology substantially influenced seasonal migration in Niger, increasing the likelihood of migration by at least one household member by 7 percentage points and the number of households' members engaging in seasonal migration. Evidence suggests that there are some heterogeneous impacts of the program, with a higher probability of a household member migrating in one region. These effects do not appear to be driven by differences in observable characteristics of households or differential effects of drought during the survey period. Rather we posit that they are largely explained by the effectiveness of mobile phones as a search technology: Students in ABC villages used mobile phones in more active ways and communicated more with migrants within Niger. These initial results suggest that simple and cheap information technology can be harnessed to affect labor mobility among rural populations.en_US
dc.publisher|aZBW - Deutsche Zentralbibliothek für Wirtschaftswissenschaften, Leibniz-Informationszentrum Wirtschaft |cKiel und Hamburgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aProceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2011 |x2en_US
dc.titleMobiles and mobility: The Effect of Mobile Phones on Migration in Nigeren_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US

Files in This Item:
182.44 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.