Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorElitok, Secil Pacacien_US
dc.contributor.authorStraubhaar, Thomasen_US
dc.description.abstractLocated at the geographical intersection between East and West, with both Mediterranean and Black Sea coasts, Turkey was always a country with large movements of people. There were several waves of forced (ethnic) movement of people as a consequence of the collapse of the Ottoman Empire and the following nation-building process in the Turkish neighborhood. In the post-Second world war period, Turkey became a country of emigration. In 1961 a bilateral agreement on labor recruitment between Turkey and Germany had been signed. In the following years, similar bilateral agreements were reached with a couple of other European countries (Austria, Belgium, France, the Netherland and Sweden). Nowadays, things have changed. Turkey is still a country of emigration. But it has also become a country of immigration and transit. And therefore, it faces similar challenges of migration and integration that are characteristic for areas with strong cross-cultural movements of people. In this paper, we concentrate on the emigration flows.en_US
dc.publisher|aHWWI Institute of International Economics |cHamburgen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aHWWI Policy Paper |x3-15en_US
dc.titleIs Turkey still an emigration country?en_US
dc.typeResearch Reporten_US

Files in This Item:
338.22 kB

Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.