Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/47486
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBerlinski, Samuelen_US
dc.contributor.authorDewan, Torunen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-18en_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-04T09:19:14Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-04T09:19:14Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/47486-
dc.description.abstractWe use evidence from the Second Reform Act, introduced in the United Kingdom in 1867, to analyze the impact on electoral outcomes of extending the vote to the unskilled urban population. By exploiting the sharp change in the electorate caused by franchise extension, we separate the effect of reform from that of underlying constituency level traits correlated with the voting population. Although we find that the franchise affected electoral competition and candidate selection, there is no evidence that relates Liberal electoral support to changes in the franchise rules. Our results are robust to various sources of endogeneity.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aInstitute for Fiscal Studies (IFS) |cLondonen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aIFS working papers |x10,08en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.stwPolitische Reformen_US
dc.subject.stwWahlrechten_US
dc.subject.stwWahlverhaltenen_US
dc.subject.stwLiberale Parteien_US
dc.subject.stwZeitgeschichteen_US
dc.subject.stwGroßbritannienen_US
dc.titleDid the extension of the franchise increase the Liberal vote in Victorian Britain? Evidence from the Second Reform Acten_US
dc.typeWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn626248329en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US

Files in This Item:
File
Size
355.77 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.