Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/44220
Authors: 
McKenzie, David
Yang, Dean
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion paper series // Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 5125
Abstract: 
The decision of whether or not to migrate has far-reaching consequences for the lives of individuals and their families. But the very nature of this choice makes identifying the impacts of migration difficult, since it is hard to measure a credible counterfactual of what the person and their household would have been doing had migration not occurred. Migration experiments provide a clear and credible way for identifying this counterfactual, and thereby allowing causal estimation of the impacts of migration. We provide an overview and critical review of the three strands of this approach: policy experiments, natural experiments, and researcher-led field experiments. The purpose is to introduce readers to the need for this approach, give examples of where it has been applied in practice, and draw out lessons for future work in this area.
Subjects: 
migration
remittances
experiment
identification
self-selection
JEL: 
O12
J61
F22
C21
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
311.29 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.