Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/44157
Authors: 
Antecol, Heather
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion paper series // Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 5089
Abstract: 
Using data from the 1980, 1990, and 2000 US Census, I find little support for the opt-out revolution - highly educated women, relative to their less educated counterparts, are exiting the labor force to care for their families at higher rates today than in earlier time periods - if one focuses solely on the decision to work a positive number of hours irrespective of marital status or race. If one, however, focuses on both the decision to work a positive number of hours as well as the decision to adjust annual hours of work (conditional on working), I find some evidence of the opt-out revolution, particularly among white college educated married women in male dominated occupations.
Subjects: 
opting out
female labor supply
extensive/intensive margin
race/ethnicity
JEL: 
J13
J15
J16
J22
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
740.52 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.