Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/44151
Authors: 
Antecol, Heather
Cobb-Clark, Deborah A.
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion paper series // Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 5093
Abstract: 
This paper investigates the role of non-cognitive skills in the occupational segregation of young workers entering the US labor market. We find entry into male-dominated fields of study and male-dominated occupations are both related to the extent to which individuals believe they are intelligent and have male traits while entry into male-dominated occupations is also related to the willingness to work hard, impulsivity, and the tendency to avoid problems. The nature of these relationships differs for men and women, however. Noncognitive skills (intelligence and impulsivity) also influence movement into higher-paid occupations, but in ways that are similar for men and women. On balance, non-cognitive skills provide an important, though incomplete, explanation for segregation in the fields that young men and women study as well as in the occupations in which they are employed.
Subjects: 
non-cognitive skills
occupation
youth
gender
JEL: 
J24
J16
J31
Persistent Identifier of the first edition: 
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
395.06 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.