Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/43340
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorDenny, Kevinen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-12-16T13:35:27Z-
dc.date.available2010-12-16T13:35:27Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/43340-
dc.description.abstractIn a 2005 paper Kanezawa proposed a generalisation of the classic Trivers-Willard hypothesis. It was argued that as a result taller and heavier parents should have more sons relative to daughters. Using two British cohort studies, evidence was presented which was partly consistent with the hypothesis. I analyse the relationship between an individual being male and their parents' height and weight using one of the datasets. No evidence of any such relationship is found.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aWorking paper series // UCD Centre for Economic Research |x2007/15en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.stwBiologieen_US
dc.subject.stwElternen_US
dc.subject.stwKinderen_US
dc.subject.stwGeschlechten_US
dc.titleBig and tall parents do not have more sonsen_US
dc.type|aWorking Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn557446228en_US
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungenen_US

Files in This Item:
File
Size





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.