Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/37210
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGeishecker, Ingoen_US
dc.date.accessioned2010-08-11T09:11:58Z-
dc.date.available2010-08-11T09:11:58Z-
dc.date.issued2010en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10419/37210-
dc.description.abstractThis paper analyzes the impact of job insecurity perceptions on individual well-being. While previous studies on the subject have used the concept of perceived job insecurity rather arbitrarily, the present analysis explicitly takes into account individual perceptions about both the likelihood and the potential costs of job loss. We demonstrate that any model assessing the impact of perceived job insecurity on individual well-being potentially suffers from simultaneity bias yielding upward-biased coefficients. When applying our concept of perceived job insecurity to concrete data from a large household panel survey we find the true unbiased effects of perceived job insecurity to be more than twice the size of estimates that ignore simultaneity. Accordingly, perceived job insecurity ranks as one of the most important factors in employee well-being and paradoxically can be even more harmful than actual job loss with subsequent unemployment.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.publisher|aVerein für Socialpolitik |cFrankfurt a. M.en_US
dc.relation.ispartofseries|aBeiträge zur Jahrestagung des Vereins für Socialpolitik 2010: Ökonomie der Familie - Session: Labor Market and Entrepreneurs: Empirical Studies |xB8-V3en_US
dc.subject.jelD84en_US
dc.subject.jelJ63en_US
dc.subject.jelZ13en_US
dc.subject.ddc330en_US
dc.subject.keywordjob securityen_US
dc.subject.keywordlife satisfactionen_US
dc.subject.keywordunemploymenten_US
dc.titlePerceived Job Insecurity and Well-Being Revisited: Towards Conceptual Clarityen_US
dc.typeConference Paperen_US
dc.identifier.ppn654583609-
dc.rightshttp://www.econstor.eu/dspace/Nutzungsbedingungen-

Files in This Item:
File
Size
256.33 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.