Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/36959
Authors: 
Cortes, Kalena E.
Bricker, Jesse
Rohlfs, Chris
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion paper series // Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 5031
Abstract: 
Absences in Chicago Public High Schools are 3-7 days per year higher in first period than at other times of the day. This study exploits this empirical regularity and the essentially random variation between students in the ordering of classes over the day to measure how the returns to classroom learning vary by course subject, and how much attendance in one class spills over into learning in other subjects. We find that having a class in first period reduces grades in that course and has little effect on long-term grades or grades in related subjects. We also find moderately-sized negative effects of having a class in first period on test scores in that subject and in related subjects, particularly for math classes.
Subjects: 
Education production
subject-specific
math
English
morning classes
first period
course schedule
quasi-experimental
attendance
absenteeism
Chicago
high school
JEL: 
I20
I21
J13
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
553.55 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.