Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/36887
Authors: 
Gindling, T. H.
Poggio, Sara Z.
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
Discussion paper series // Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit 4887
Abstract: 
For many immigrants, especially those from Central America and Mexico, it is common for a mother or father (or both) to migrate to the United States and leave their children behind. Then, after the parent(s) have achieved some degree of stability in the United States, the children follow. Using qualitative and quantitative methods, we examined the hypothesis that separation during migration results in problems at school after re-unification. We find that children separated from parents during migration are more likely to be behind others their age in school and are more likely to drop out of high school.
Subjects: 
Immigrant children
education
family separation
JEL: 
I2
J13
J61
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
204.75 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.