Bitte verwenden Sie diesen Link, um diese Publikation zu zitieren, oder auf sie als Internetquelle zu verweisen: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/36696
Autoren: 
Dallinger, David
Krampe, Daniel
Wietschel, Martin
Datum: 
2010
Reihe/Nr.: 
Working Paper Sustainability and Innovation S4/2010
Zusammenfassung: 
This study establishes a new approach to analyzing the economic impacts of vehicle-to-grid (V2G) regulation by simulating the restrictions arising from un-predictable mobility requests by vehicle users. A case study for Germany using average daily values (in the following also called the "static" approach) and a dynamic simulation including different mobility use patterns are presented. Comparing the dynamic approach with the static approach reveals a significant difference in the power a vehicle can offer for regulation and provides insights into the necessary size of vehicle pools and the possible adaptations required in the regulation market to render V2G feasible. In a first step, the regulation of primary, secondary and tertiary control is ana-lyzed based on previous static methods used to investigate V2G and data from the four German regulation areas. It is shown that negative secondary control is economically the most beneficial for electric vehicles because it offers the high-est potential for charging with 'low-priced' energy from negative regulation. In a second step, a new method based on a Monte Carlo simulation using stochastic mobility behavior is applied to look at the negative secondary control market in more detail. Our simulation indicates that taking dynamic driving behavior into account results in a 40% reduction of the power available for regulation. Be-cause of the high value of power in the regulation market this finding has a strong impact on the resulting revenues. Further, we demonstrate that, for the data used, a pool size of 10,000 vehicles seems reasonable to balance the var-iation in driving behavior of each individual. In the case of the German regula-tion market, which uses monthly bids, a daily or hourly bid period is recom-mended. This adaptation would be necessary to provide individual regulation assuming that the vehicles are primarily used for mobility reasons and cannot deliver the same amount of power every hour of the week.
Persistent Identifier der Erstveröffentlichung: 
Dokumentart: 
Working Paper

Datei(en):
Datei
Größe
947.99 kB





Publikationen in EconStor sind urheberrechtlich geschützt.