Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/10419/36235
Authors: 
López Bóo, Florencia
Year of Publication: 
2010
Series/Report no.: 
IZA Discussion Papers 4692
Abstract: 
This paper examines the effect of labor market opportunities on schooling-employment decisions in 12 urban areas in Argentina over 12 years, emphasizing the recession/crisis years 1998-2002. The effects of macroeconomic swings on schooling decisions are examined with a focus on whether the income or substitution effect dominates as macroeconomic conditions change. I demonstrate that over typical years deteriorating job rates (or wages) increase the probability of attending school and decrease the probability of combining work and school, particularly for boys. After controlling for household and individual characteristics I find that the probability of being in school for secondary school youth was about 6 percentage points higher in 2002 than in 1998 (before the recession started). In fact, a 10 percent decrease in the job rate alone has been responsible for a 5.4 percentage point rise in the probability of school attendance since 2000. This effect is attenuated during the 2002 crisis when household expectations change in response to shocks. These estimates allow for the fact that a new Federal Education Law (FEL) in 1996 extended mandatory education to 10 years and might have affected schooling outcomes.
Subjects: 
Schooling decision
macroeconomic shocks
local labor market opportunities
JEL: 
I21
J31
Document Type: 
Working Paper

Files in This Item:
File
Size
636.94 kB





Items in EconStor are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.